No Nappy Weekend - It's Wee Wee Time


Parent reading story

Have you gone through the checklist?

* Underwear - tick

* Potty or toilet insert - tick

* "Age appropriate talk" about how they don't need to wear nappies during the day  - tick

* Gentle reminders - tick

* More gentle reminders - double tick

Still no action.....

Waiting...

Yes they will sit on the toilet, do nothing on it.

5 minutes later - a wee puddle in the lounge.

Today I am letting you in on the secrets about how to catch that first wee on the toilet.

Once you know your child can do it they are away, it is sometimes just encouraging your child to catch the first or second or third wee in the loo that can be the tricky bit. Here are some awesome ideas to get you started.

1. Assume the wee position

By encouraging your child to have their knees apart the muscles will open and be more relaxed to help your child to do a wee.

Feet flat and grounded on a step stool helps them to feel more secure and relaxed.

It is preferable to encourage boys to sit down when they are first learning to use the loo as it takes out the variable of having to aim. He will let you know when he is ready to start standing up to pee.

2. Release the wee muscles

Relax and blow out...it is this motion that helps release the muscles. Getting your child to blow a balloon or bubbles while sitting on their toilet seat or potty, is not only about making the toilet a more fun place to visit but it also helps your child to release wees.

3. Water has magical power

If you have ever tried to hold on to wees while listening to the sound of running water, or you have found your child peeing in the bath - you will know the magical power that water has. It is very difficult to hold a full bladder when you are in or are listening to running water.

Having a bowl of warm water with marbles to pick out of the bottom can be a great activity for your child to do when they are sitting waiting to do the business.

Put the potty out while the bath water is running.

Wash your hands while they are sitting on the loo.

And watch the magic happen!

4. Help them relax

By asking your child would they like some alone time or would they like you to be there, you are helping them to feel comfortable. They need to feel supported and encouraged but given the space to work out how to release the wees from their body.

Lets be honest giving them 'alone time' means you standing around the corner checking that they are not stuffing a toilet roll down the toilet or eating the toilet brush!

Singing a familiar song not only helps your child to relax but also gives them a time frame. Expecting a child to sit on the toilet for 10-15 minutes or until they have done the wees on it can mean that your child does not want to return. 

Try to avoid asking them and nagging them to sit on the toilet as the common answer is likely to be "NO".
Toilet training toddlers
5. Be playful

Kids learn the best through play, so finding ways to make going to the loo less daunting can help. Bubbles, songs, stories, changing the colour of the toilet water and role play with favourite toys are all great ways of desensitising the toilet and making your child feel more in control and engaged.

Using language and phrases that your child understands really helps. "Let's see if we can catch a wee in the loo".

I dare you to try a Weepals sticker.

Stick it at the bottom of the potty and when your child wees on it a special character appears. They are just so much fun, kids love them! They last for 1-2 months and you wash the potty as you always would, they go back to normal when cold water hits the sticker.

Choose from a butterfly, octopus, digger, car, fire truck, target, dinosaur, or motorbike.
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6. Give them ownership and choice
By asking - would you like to use the potty or the toilet you are empowering your child to feel more in control.  Most kids are more likely to catch their first wee on the potty because it puts them in a great body position, it is normally accessible close to where they play and it is easy for them to get on and off.
7. Be realistic
Don't expect that they will initiate going to the toilet/potty in the initial stages. You will need to let them know it is time to have a try to catch a wee on the loo. Don't worry if in the first 4 days your child wees more often. It is entirely normal. Lots of kids wee more often as they are learning how their body works and how to release wees on cue. 

Happy toilet training, Laura